United States of America Sundyne to Receive Business Award

Oct. 11, 2007
United States of America

Reprinted courtersy of the Arvada Press, October 11, 2007
By Megan Quin,
 meganq@milehighnews.com

Sundyne is a global company whose products are shipped to all corners of the world. But for the City of Arvada, Sundyne's reach is more local.

"Anytime we ask them for anything, they're there," said Hazel Hartbarger, deputy director of the Arvada Economic Development Association.

Sundyne is among 11 businesses receiving the annual Outstanding Arvada Business Award on Oct. 12 at AEDA's 13th annual Arvada Business Award banquet. Sundyne employs about 350 people.

Most live in Arvada or the surrounding area. The company's recent plans for expansion and their involvement with community service are a few reasons AEDA selected Sundyne for the award.

Sundyne produces pumps and compressors for natural gas, chemical processing, food processing and other applications.

Although it's more likely their heavy equipment will be shipped to oil refineries or factories across the country and world, their international headquarters is in the heart of Arvada near 64th Avenue and Indiana. They've recently planned to expand their 30-year-old facility to accommodate larger equipment and more output.

"We've outgrown the size of our facility," said Jeff Wiemelt, vice president and general manager of Sundyne. "We've expanded our product capabilities by about four times in the last five years."

The industry is also facing a growth in machine size, another reason why the facility will expand, he said.

Recently, the facility prepared to move a three-ton machine destined for an oil refinery in the Congo.

" The products we build are getting bigger because the plants they go to are getting bigger," Wiemelt said.

Sundyne plans to add between 15,000 and 20,000 square feet to their facility to accommodate larger pump and compressor models. Wiemelt said they plan to break ground in early 2008.

In the meantime, some new Sundyne employees are using a trailer as an office because there isn't an appropriate space for them to work in a quiet environment, he said.

The 14 new employees are working on product development, an area Wiemelt said Sundyne spends a lot of money to maintain.

In addition to a product development team, Sundyne's Arvada office has its own engineers and designers who help clients create custom pumps and compressors for their businesses.

Customers may need equipment for anything from propylene production to making ice cream, said Christine Lopez, Sundyne's human resources representative.

Staying in Arvada instead of pulling up stakes for a larger facility elsewhere is one reason the company will be recognized for the award, Hartbarger said.

Sundyne's large employee base and manufacturing power makes a big impact on Arvada's economy.

"Sundyne is one of our largest manufacturers in Arvada," she said.

Sundyne also makes an impact by partnering with the community, she said. When residents from Arvada's sister city in China came to visit, "They opened their doors to the Chinese delegation," she said.

A Sundyne representative also appeared with the mayor on KATV to help promote the city's Arvada Job Link, a web site that lists jobs in the area.

Lopez said the company asks their employees to recommend local charities, non-profits or youth organizations to sponsor.

"They came up with 55 different organizations — everything from Arvada soccer to women's shelters," Lopez said.

Sundyne will receive their award along with local businesses such as D Note, Sopheon and Alamos Verdes.

The need to recognize local businesses is important to keeping Arvada's economy thriving, Hartbarger said.

"So many of these businesses are so involved," she said.